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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> folks, this is not hard. this ain't rocket science. it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision is made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent the middle class tax cut. the president would probably have me sprint up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. it can be done like that. it is not complicated. >> vice president joe biden did not waver on the white house's position. it's all about the top tax rates. >> every serious economist i have spoken to, left, right, and center, knows you have to do something about revenue and rates. you can't get there from here without affecting these people around this table and all of the sudden going into the deductibility of health care in terms of their employment or fooling around with the mortgage deductions. you can't get there without the rates being affected. >> the white house is not backing down on rates. the president sent his legislative affairs director to meet with the republicans on the hill. he told him the white house is not moving on rates. a source close to the negotiations told politico once repu
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
. caller: c-span could put on actual science. i think there is a lot of magical thinking on the part of democrats here. first of all, they are assuming if they raise the taxes on this one%, it will not affect the jobs and the companies that they work for. nor would it affect the customers they have. what are the percentages of the most important job creators around? how did you identify them? they had no clue. i think the other aspect of magical thinking is that in the noise and the signal, nate silver pointed out previously a 12% rise in gdp might ake for a 2% rise in employment. in 2005, we got 3.5 million jobs lost. it is a fantasy to believe that the president's spending is going to make employment rise more. recently, there has been an article by a harvard university law professor who says if you are going to do this thing, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raisi
is the telecommunications industry. one of the reasons as a computer science major i would argue, one of the reasons that the telecommunications, technology industry has been so successful, is because the government hasn't figured out how to regulate it and slow it down. yet here you have a proposal by the united nations coming out of the united nations to interfere with that multistakeholder organization that's been and allowed this industry to be so successful and allowed the internet to shape and dramatically improve so many people's lives. so many of the things that we can do today and all the conveniences that have been added through great new apps and technology have come from this multistakeholder governance of the internet. yet here you have the united nations trying to step in and let's be real clear about who some of these countries are that want to do this and what they are intending to do if they were to be successful. countries like russia and china are leading this. some of the arab nations right now, where you see uprisings, many of those uprisings have been brought through social med
could lose their jobs and science and public research grants could be cut including in to cancer and childhood diseases. fewer americans could receive drug abuse treatment and $700 million slashed from the epa budget. cutting back of food inspection. disaster relief, omb says, quote, the federal emergency management administration's ability to respond would be undermined. and finally, from border patrol to hiring new fbi agents, correction officers, federal prosecutors, all could be scaled back. now, all of these cuts, brooke, don't happen exactly at 12:01 a.m. on january 2nd. they happen over the course of a year. but agencies are preparing for an impasse in washington. this is exactly, exactly what policymakers are trying to avoid. brooke? >> thank you. >>> shock waves in washington today. powerful republican senator calling it quits. south carolina's senator jim demint will be stepping down december 31st to lead the heritage foundation. that's a powerful conservative think tank in d.c. demint says he can be more effective outside the senate. >> a lot of my role in the senate h
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)